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University politics

On this page we would like to introduce you to the most important committees at our department. An overview of all committees of the university, especially the inter-departmental committees can be found in the StudiWiki. In general, it is important to distinguish between the committees of the student body (e.g. the student councils, the Students' Parliament or the AStA) and the bodies of the university (e.g. the department councils or the Senate).

Committees at the department

What does it do?

The Student Council (FSR) is the first committee of the student body that you come into contact with. Everything concerning parties and events is organized here. So the party, game nights, Doppelkopf nights and Freizeitveranstaltungen are planned by the FSR. In addition to this undoubtedly important part of its work, the FSR is also elected for university politics. Thus, the FSR acts as the first point of contact for the other two groups (faculty, staff) of the department. But the FSR also takes initiative in the other direction, e.g. if problems arise, it tries to solve these with the persons concerned. In addition, many members of the FSR sit on committees of the Department Council and therefore also determine, for example, what should be done with the tuition fees. Once a year, the FSR awards a teaching prize to particularly committed teachers.

How is the FSR elected?

The Student Council is elected every semester at a Student Assembly (FVV). Here, everyone who wants to participate can stand for election. It is especially important for the networking in all semesters that freshmen are represented. Previous knowledge is not necessary, most of the (important) information is given in the meetings or can be asked for.

What does it mean to be an FSR member?

Being in the FSR means first of all to participate in every meeting of the student council. These meetings are once a week during the lecture period, plus a few dates in the lecture-free period. Furthermore, each member takes over a task, such as the planning of parties and events, the representation on FsRK meetings (the conference of all student councils of the university) or the protocol lending. In addition, you should be willing to take on other irregular tasks of everyday business. This can be, for example, getting groceries. In general, the work in the student council is only as time-consuming as one is willing and able to do.

What does it do?

The Department Council is formally the highest body of the department. It is made up of professors, staff and students. The distribution of those entitled to vote is 6:2:2. In the Department Council, everything is decided that has "legal character" for the department. If you compare it with big politics, the Department Council is probably the state parliament of the university. In the Department Council, course catalogs are decided upon, committee papers are discussed, and regulations such as the study regulations are voted on. The Dean is also elected by the Department Council. An important point of the Department Council are the committees, in which a large part of the daily work takes place.

How is it elected?

The Department Council is elected each winter semester in parallel with the Senate elections. For this purpose, lists of candidates are drawn up beforehand. In recent years, there has basically always been a single list in the statistics, from which individual students were then elected.

What does it mean for me to be on this board?

The Department Council meets regularly twice a semester. You should be present at these meetings and the corresponding preliminary discussions. Since there is a lot of talking and discussing with professors and staff members in this committee, you should not be afraid of these people. Fear is also completely unjustified, because a) no one bites your head off, b) a discussion is appreciated and c) the representatives of the student body are there precisely to represent the position of the students.

Before the individual committees are introduced, the general things about them should be clarified first. Most of the committees consist of one or two student members, the same number of research assistants and three or four professors. Only in the QV-committee the key is 4:2:2, so that here the student members are of greater importance. Note that the official language of all committees is German, which you need to speak fluently to join. Regardless, we want to give you an overview to understand the "inner politics" of the department.

How are they elected?

Formally, the committees are elected by the student representatives in the Department Council. In practice, however, the FSR tries to send people to the committees. These people do not necessarily have to be members of the FSR. Instead, the proposals that are then put forward by the students in the Department Council are prepared by the FSR beforehand. If you want to participate in a committee, just contact the FSR. We are happy for every helping hand.

What does it do?

The examination board decides on the interpretation of the exam regulations and negotiates applications requesting, for example, an additional attempt at an exam or a different form of exam. The frequency of meetings varies, but it is usually no more than once per semester. Each study program has its own examination board with corresponding professors, staff and students.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

First of all, it means to vote on applications of fellow students from time to time and thus to partly decide on the future of other people. Otherwise, it also means that the position of students is represented and now and then a way can be found to enable fellow students to continue their studies.

What does it do?

The doctoral commission decides on all matters relating to the Ph.D. students. Priority is given here to decisions on admission to the doctoral process.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

Similar to the examination board, but smaller in scale.

What does it do?

There is hardly any other committee that you hear about as often as this one, which is also due in no small part to its name (a German pun). In the LuSt, all concerns of the study program are decided and discussed. Here, study plans are changed, minor subjects (in both directions) are developed and approved, and decisions are made about exam forms. The commission also meets only about once a semester.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

In the LuSt, you can probably try to change something directly in your studies. As a student, you are naturally "closer" to the topics under discussion and can (and must) take a stand on the problems. The staff is usually very grateful for such first-hand experiences.

 

What does it do?

Basically exactly what the name says: deciding on spaces and co-deciding on buildings. Since these are only very rarely changed, this commission also meets very very rarely.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

If it does meet, it must be ensured that the sofa room is defended (at all costs, with pitchforks and torches if necessary).

What does it do?

The Committee for General Direction determines the rough direction of the department (What is the focus of the department? Where should it go in terms of research and teaching? etc.) and is therefore a very important committee. However, it is never convened at our university, since everything goes directly through the Department Council, which takes over the tasks. Even at university level, this committee is somewhat neglected.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

Your name appears on a list. That's all.

What does it do?

In this committee the budget of the department is decided. How the money is distributed among the chairs can be determined (or just nodded) here. The committee meets once a year.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

Nodding off the budget once a year. It has to be done.

What does it do?

In this committee, in which as many students as members of the other groups sit together, the use of the tuition fees is determined. It often does not meet in person, but votes via e-mail.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

Co-determination of tuition money. Here the students have the power to determine what happens with the money (e.g. funding tutorials) and should also use it. For this it is important to consider how one stands to the projects. Also, the connection to the FSR is important here, because this body, more than any other, ultimately decides on the use of tuition fees.

What does it do?

The committee almost never meets. Otherwise, however, it is responsible for all matters concerning the library. This means to make book suggestions. These can also be made directly in the library or at the FSR, which will then forward them.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

To make an active effort to select literature that is useful for our studies, and in this matter, for example, to ask teachers for literature recommendations.

What does it do?

The Public Relations Committee is responsible for representing the department to potential students. For this purpose, for example, taster days for pupils or information brochures are created. Videos or online offers are also designed here.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

If you live and breathe statistics, this is where you can present fresh ideas to bring the study to the people. The committee meets about once or twice a semester, depending on the frequency of classes.

What does it do?

The IT committee determines the equipment of the computer rooms and the like. It is traditionally staffed by the student assistants that are in charge of the computers.

What does it mean for me to be on this committee?

You can decide how the computer pools are equipped.

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Location & approach

The campus of TU Dort­mund Uni­ver­sity is located close to interstate junction Dort­mund West, where the Sauerlandlinie A 45 (Frankfurt-Dort­mund) crosses the Ruhrschnellweg B 1 / A 40. The best interstate exit to take from A 45 is “Dort­mund-Eichlinghofen” (closer to South Cam­pus), and from B 1 / A 40 “Dort­mund-Dorstfeld” (closer to North Cam­pus). Signs for the uni­ver­si­ty are located at both exits. Also, there is a new exit before you pass over the B 1-bridge leading into Dort­mund.

To get from North Cam­pus to South Cam­pus by car, there is the connection via Vo­gel­pothsweg/Baroper Straße. We recommend you leave your car on one of the parking lots at North Cam­pus and use the H-Bahn (suspended monorail system), which conveniently connects the two campuses.

TU Dort­mund Uni­ver­sity has its own train station (“Dort­mund Uni­ver­si­tät”). From there, suburban trains (S-Bahn) leave for Dort­mund main station (“Dort­mund Hauptbahnhof”) and Düsseldorf main station via the “Düsseldorf Airport Train Station” (take S-Bahn number 1, which leaves every 15 or 30 minutes). The uni­ver­si­ty is easily reached from Bochum, Essen, Mülheim an der Ruhr and Duis­burg.

You can also take the bus or subway train from Dort­mund city to the uni­ver­si­ty: From Dort­mund main station, you can take any train bound for the Station “Stadtgarten”, usually lines U41, U45, U 47 and U49. At “Stadtgarten” you switch trains and get on line U42 towards “Hombruch”. Look out for the Station “An der Palmweide”. From the bus stop just across the road, busses bound for TU Dort­mund Uni­ver­sity leave every ten minutes (445, 447 and 462). Another option is to take the subway routes U41, U45, U47 and U49 from Dort­mund main station to the stop “Dort­mund Kampstraße”. From there, take U43 or U44 to the stop “Dort­mund Wittener Straße”. Switch to bus line 447 and get off at “Dort­mund Uni­ver­si­tät S”.

The H-Bahn is one of the hallmarks of TU Dort­mund Uni­ver­sity. There are two stations on North Cam­pus. One (“Dort­mund Uni­ver­si­tät S”) is directly located at the suburban train stop, which connects the uni­ver­si­ty directly with the city of Dort­mund and the rest of the Ruhr Area. Also from this station, there are connections to the “Technologiepark” and (via South Cam­pus) Eichlinghofen. The other station is located at the dining hall at North Cam­pus and offers a direct connection to South Cam­pus every five minutes.

The AirportExpress is a fast and convenient means of transport from Dort­mund Airport (DTM) to Dort­mund Central Station, taking you there in little more than 20 minutes. From Dort­mund Central Station, you can continue to the uni­ver­si­ty campus by interurban railway (S-Bahn). A larger range of in­ter­na­tio­nal flight connections is offered at Düsseldorf Airport (DUS), which is about 60 kilometres away and can be directly reached by S-Bahn from the uni­ver­si­ty station.